some pig!

First up, congrats to Sue P and Jackie for winning the two Dixie Belle problem solver giveaways from last Monday (both winners have been contacted by email).

OK, I think it’s safe to reveal one of the new designs from re.design with prima today.  As you may know, as one of their brand ambassadors I get the opportunity to work with new designs before they are released to the public.  When they send these preview items to me, they come all rolled up together in a tube for a different transfer because the official packaging isn’t available yet.  In other words, I don’t really know what I’ve gotten until I take them out of the tube and unroll them.

Well, as soon as I unrolled the Farm Life transfers I fell in love with the pig.

Even Mr. Q said that was some pig.  It totally made us both think of Wilbur from Charlotte’s Web.  He does look ‘terrific’, ‘radiant’, and ‘humble’, doesn’t he?

You’d think I had a thing for pigs.  This is the 2nd time I’ve fallen in love with a pig.  The first time it was these knob transfers from prima’s Farmhouse Delight set.

But no, I don’t normally especially admire pigs.  Something about these two designs just spoke to me.

Anyway, as soon as I saw the new Farm Life set I knew I wanted to create a quartet of signs made on old cupboard doors.  There was only one problem, I didn’t have any old cupboard doors that were the right size.  So I decided to check out my local Habitat for Humanity ReStore.

I’d never been to a ReStore before, so I didn’t know quite what to expect.  I also was keeping my expectations low because really, what are the chances that I would find specifically what I was looking for at a 2nd hand store?

Well, as it turned out, apparently pretty good.  I found 4 cupboard doors that were exactly the size I needed.

Well, in fact I found 5.  So even though I only needed 4, I bought all five.  I can always do something else with the 5th one.

The prices were right too.  I got all 5 of them for just under $20.

I would have preferred old cabinet doors with several layers of old paint on them, but three of these were unfinished and the other two had a clear poly on them.  And I knew I could recreate that look myself.  I started out with a layer of Dixie Belle’s Cocoa Bean.

I just painted around the perimeter in this dark brown color because I wanted to see just hints of it when I distressed the edges.

Next I added a layer of Miss Mustard Seed’s Milk Paint in Kitchen Scale.  I think this color has a historic feel.  As though these cupboard doors were painted back in the 50’s, and then painted over again later.  Perfect for adding a little age to them.

Finally, I added several coats of Sweet Pickins Milk Paint in Window Pane.

I did get some good chipping, which is what I was going for.  However, I was surprised to find that the paint chipped all the way down to the original finish.  In other words, even the Dixie Belle Cocoa Bean paint chipped off in spots.

But that only happened on the two doors that had started out with a clear poly, so in hindsight that does make some sense.

Once all four cupboard doors were painted and sanded to distress the edges, I vacuumed away any loose paint and then added the transfers.  There are four designs in this set and each one is approx. 11″ wide x 16″ tall.

There’s the cows …

The chickens …

The horses …

And of course, the pigs …

There are some interesting bits of info on each one …

Who knew that the chicken was the closest living relative of the t-rex?

Once the transfers were in place, I added a topcoat of The Real Milk Paint Co’s Finishing Cream.  I used the Low Sheen version this time, but I have used the Dead Flat version in the past and I really don’t see much of a difference between the two.  I like using this product over chippy milk paint because it’s thick and therefore I’m not in danger of getting any runs.

Once that dried, I added some label holders to the bottom of each cupboard door.

I purchased these in sets of 3 from Hobby Lobby for $3.99. (although I’m sure I bought them during a 40% off sale and probably only paid $2.40 for them).

They are technically for scrapbooking and came with brads to attach them to paper, but I swapped out the brads for little tacks to hold them to my cupboard doors.

I filled them with some vintage price tags that I also had in my stash of scrapbooking supplies.

And just like that, I created some unique wall art.

Wouldn’t these doors be fun hung on the wall in a farmhouse style kitchen?

Although I’ve turned old cupboard doors into wall art, you could apply these transfers right to your kitchen cabinets.  They would also be perfect for adding to the cupboard doors on an old hoosier cabinet or hutch.  Or, you could cut up the designs and use smaller sections on canisters.  There are so many possibilities.  What would you do with them?

As always, thank you to re.design with prima for providing the transfers used in today’s project.  If you’re looking for a place to purchase their products, you can find info on online or retail stores here.

I’ve also used products from Dixie Belle Paint Co, Miss Mustard Seed’s Milk Paint, Sweet Pickins Milk Paint and The Real Milk Paint Co today, all of whom have provided me with free products (although I haven’t necessarily kept track of which ones I’ve paid for and which ones were complimentary!)

Finally, these Farm Life doors are for sale locally at $30 each (you must be able to pick them up at my house in a suburb of St. Paul, MN).  I’ll soon be taking them in to Reclaiming Beautiful (the shop where I sell on consignment), but in the meantime if you’re local and need some cute signs be sure to leave a comment or reach out via email at qisforquandie@gmail.com.

17 thoughts on “some pig!

  1. You really Scored with those doors. The style comes off like they’re framed. These would be charming in a farmhouse kitchen. But my favorite would have to be the chickens. And I did not know about the t-rex connection. I do however love those pig knob transfers. I remember when you did those such a clever touch.

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  2. So adorable! When I saw that transfer, early this morning, my first thoughts were, what on earth would I do with that one. You hit it out of the park! Not surprised!

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    1. I do think they’d be fun on an actual cupboard, but for those who are afraid of committing to putting a transfer on actual cupboards could use this idea instead 🙂

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  3. Hey Miss Quandie! This is a bit of a heavy dose of “farmhouse” for my taste……..but for the right person these would be beautiful…….you did a great job using the cabinet doors!

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  4. Love all of them Linda!! The idea is brilliant!! I especially love the colorful price tags at the bottom.
    Btw, we had some interesting discussion with on of my friends – do you have to be born with ability to see the beauty in ordinary objects, or it’s some sort of skill you can develop. What do you think? Were you born with it?

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    1. Hmmmm. Good question Olga! I don’t know that there is an absolute answer. I suppose it can go either way. Certainly one can learn to see the beauty in ordinary objects if they want to. Maybe the real question is whether or not the desire for that skill is one you’re born with. If you have no interest in it, well, then you’ll probably never develop that skill. Wow, this is getting deep …

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      1. I agree – if you have a desire, you can learn. I personally have no desire or talent for math or any science, and although i know i can learn, the spark will never be there…. So maybe all of us are born with desires for different things… I’ll stop here, it IS getting deep 🙂

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